Multi-Purpose Peer Review to Support All Students

  • Aimee Weinstein George Mason University
Keywords: active learning, team-based learning, critical thinking

Abstract

NOTE: This teaching activity showcase is one of two during the 10:30am-12:00pm session.  It will be presented within that session from 11:20am to 12:00pm.

BRIEF SESSION DESCRIPTION:

Multi-purpose peer review is an alternative method of peer review in which students work in small groups using reviewer prompt cards to review peer work.  Students utilize their speaking and listening skills alongside their writing and revision skills to further enhance learning and engage in critical thinking. It can be used in writing classes and transition classes for both undergraduate and graduate students, as well as support for native speakers of English, multi-lingual learners, and international students.  Participants will experience one round of this review process as "students" and be able to describe how they could use it in their own course.

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FULL ABSTRACT:

Multi-purpose peer review is an alternative method of peer review in which students work in small groups using reviewer prompt cards to review peer work.  Students utilize their speaking and listening skills alongside their writing and revision skills to further enhance learning and engage in critical thinking. It can be used in writing classes and transition classes for both undergraduate and graduate students, as well as support for native speakers of English, multi-lingual learners, and international students.  Participants will experience one round of this review process and be able to describe how they could use it in their own course.

This activity forces students to hear and listen as well as give oral feedback and has worked well to help INTO Mason students gain confidence with their skills as well as gain valuable feedback on essays of all types. This activity is scalable depending on the number of students in your class – there should be groups of four students. Create several sets of notecards, each with one card that says:

•Author

•"I like..."

•"I suggest"

•Wildcard

 

Put the students in groups so they face each other and give them the cards.  The function of the cards are as follows:

 

Author: This student will read the paper aloud or a chosen section of it. He or she will read carefully and slowly to ensure his or her groupmates understand the work. 

 

I Like: The holder of this card must say at least one thing he or she likes about what was just read.  The description should be detailed and provide specific examples about what the author did well in his or her essay.

 

I Suggest: The holder of this card must give a minimum of one suggestion for improvement of the essay.  The feedback should be detailed and specific, focused on clarity and ideas, not grammar.  

 

Wildcard: The holder of this card can say whatever he or she wants about the essay, either positive or constructively critical.  

 

Author Biography

Aimee Weinstein, George Mason University
Dr. Aimee Ledewitz Weinstein is a half-time professor and half-time academic advisor with INTO Mason, where she works with International Graduate students on their research writing, transition management and other assorted aspects that characterize a move to a new culture and American university life. She received her doctorate from the Department of Higher Education at George Mason University where she focused on teaching writing to second language learners via a hybrid classroom. Dr. Weinstein lived for more than ten years in Tokyo, Japan where she taught writing at Temple University, Japan. Her publications are mostly from Japan and include English-language travel and food journals as well as both print and online news sources.
Published
2018-08-08