Undergraduate scholarship: Local is global, and global is local

Bethany Usher

Session Information

Year: 2016 | Time: 10:30am-11:10am | Location: Innovation Hall (Room 131)

Abstract

Research and Travel Abroad are considered two important high impact practices for undergraduate students, but are seen as separate learning opportunities. However, we know that these experiences are connected: faculty often study and collaborate internationally, and employers are seeking students who can apply knowledge to real-world problems and have cultural competency (Hart Research Associates, 2015).  In this conversation with faculty, I build on five years of Students as Scholars experience to promote a more nuanced and integrated view of “global” research. Students work on projects that usually fall into one of three categories: locally/regionally-focused, internationally-focused, and site-independent (with implicit global value). The location of the research can be at Mason, or in an international location. By framing the scholarly projects using this intersection of topic and location, we can create projects in and beyond the classroom in ways that intentionally teach about global issues through inquiry and research.  During this session, after presenting the model, participants will brainstorm ways to integrate global perspectives in research courses, study abroad experiences, and scholarly projects that involve students.

 

Hart Research Associates (2015) Falling Short? College Learning and Career Success. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities. Retrieved from https://www.aacu.org/leap/public-opinion-research/2015-survey-falling-short

Keywords

inquiry-based learning; place-based learning; research experiences for undergraduates; global learning; multidisciplinary learning

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